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Newsgroups: comp.unix.sco.misc
From: bill@wjv.com (Bill Vermillion)
Subject: Re: Login prompt very slow
Message-ID: <G20sDr.19L3@wjv.com> 
References: <8rivo7$ufn$1@nnrp1.deja.com>
<4.3.2.7.2.20001006074711.00ad7ad0@172.20.1.1>
<39DDC0F2.C90323CB@aplawrence.com>
<4.3.2.7.2.20001006105411.00dce370@scogr1.cscc.maximus.com> Date: Fri, 6 Oct 2000 17:53:51 GMT In article <4.3.2.7.2.20001006105411.00dce370@scogr1.cscc.maximus.com>, Ken Wolff <kenw@cscc.maximus.com> wrote: >At 01:55 PM 10/6/00 +0000, Bill Vermillion wrote: >>And it's not a problem when the networks are properly set up.

>Except when your using DNS and your internet connection goes down.
>Despite having all local IPs in /etc/hosts and having "hostresorder
>local bind" in /etc/resolv.conf, once we loose our internet
>connection we run into the delay.

I still say 'when the networks are properly set up'.

If your internet connection goes down and you won't be able to get
to external sites. 

So I'm assuming you are having local problems. Go back and read the
fixes. If you have windows machines make sure they all have the
entries in them.

Or better yet, run DNS locally, and have every machine point to
that.  The other solutions - all machines have their own private
version of the /etc/hosts file - get's cumbersome to maintain.

DNS isn't that hard.  And it's a one place solution - maintain it
on one machine and just add entries when knew machines come up.



Instead of adding ONE line to /etc/hosts, you add a line to
what is the DNS hosts equivalent AND a line to the reverse mapped
file.   Editing two files to add one machine - and having everyting
work properly - is a very small price to pay.

Again - the problem is that the target machines can't resolve the
IP/name of the connecting machine.  Why local machines are not seen
when your ISP goes down is a strange scenario in my way of looking
at networks.

Since most of the machines I work on are net connected, I prefer
the really secure approach, and if you can't be resolved you are
ignored.   The argument that Linux lets you in immediately won't
work for me - I'm the type that keeps my doors locked when I'm
inside too.

Bill

-- 
Bill Vermillion -   bv @ wjv . com



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